Bridges that connect—Bridges to Prosperity

A good transportation infrastructure is not a given in every region of the world. Changing this situation is part of HOCHTIEF’s core business. Our sponsorship commitments are the social complement of our business activities: our mission is to better connect people. That is why our cooperation with the non-governmental organization, Bridges to Prosperity (B2P), is one of HOCHTIEF’s main areas of sponsorship. Together we are building footbridges in remote regions of the world, thus providing the local communities with better access to trade, education and medical care.

By also getting involved in the world’s poorer regions, HOCHTIEF wishes to both improve the infrastructure and transfer knowledge about bridge-building. The footbridges being built in conjunction with B2P are important links for the respective communities because they cross rivers that swell enormously during the rainy season, turning them into dangerous obstacles. HOCHTIEF ensures that they can be crossed safely.

Each bridge moreover represents a win-win situation for everybody involved because ten employees are sent to the given region for each project, to support the construction work and to share their know-how with the local inhabitants. In this way the locals can maintain the bridges themselves later on. The HOCHTIEF employees become familiar with a new culture and discover what it’s like to do something good with colleagues under the most basic of conditions, and thus help other people. They bring this team spirit back home with them and apply it to their daily work.

Our American subsidiaries—and, most notably, the infrastructure specialists at Flatiron—have already been supporting B2P for several years on projects in Latin America. Flatiron makes a special contribution as B2P’s strategic partner, and provides its specialist knowledge to help develop the bridge models. In 2012 HOCHTIEF in Germany and Europe joined in this work, and has been supporting projects in Rwanda since then. By the end of 2016 a total of 20 bridges have been built that are now used by an estimated 5,800 people every day.